Piazza-20150224–3603-Edit
Piazza-20150224–3603-Edit

GREEN GARLIC VICHYSSOISE
PHOTOS BY MICHAEL PIAZZA / STYLED BY CATRINE KELTY
Submitted by Heather Long of Jamaica Plain. She gets her copy of Edible Boston at City Feed in Jamaica Plain or at Allandale Farm in Brookline.

I first tasted green garlic when I received some in my weekly farm share from Siena Farms. The taste is milder than cured garlic, with a simultaneously earthy, pungent, and green flavor that is unique. It will always remind me of spring, and of the excitement of receiving my first box of vegetables from the farm each year in June. I make this soup every spring now, as a small celebration of ending the long winter wait for fresh produce!

The recipe is adapted from one that was sent with my farm share, which was in turn adapted from a 2011 New York Times feature on green garlic recipes. It is a lighter, fresher version of vichyssoise, with a nod to the earthy garlic soups of Southern France and Spain.

Serves 6

INGREDIENTS
¾ pound green garlic (including stalks)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large or 2 small leeks, white and light green parts, sliced (about a pound)
1 celery stalk, sliced
1 pound Yukon gold, russet, or other firm potatoes, cubed (peeled if you prefer a smooth soup)
6 cups chicken stock (water or vegetable stock may be substituted)
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs fresh parsley
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Chopped flat-leaf parsley, chervil, or tarragon for garnish

DIRECTIONS

Trim the tough ends of the green garlic stalks and chop coarsely. You should have about a cup. Heat the olive oil over medium heat in a large, heavy bottomed pot. Add the leeks, green garlic, and celery. Sprinkle with a little salt. Cook until softened, about 5 to 10 minutes. Add the potatoes, stock, bay leaf, thyme, and salt to taste. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and simmer 30 minutes or until potatoes are soft.

If you prefer a smooth soup, purée using a blender or immersion blender. Reheat, add pepper, and adjust seasonings to taste. Serve garnished with freshly chopped herbs. Can be served hot or cold.

Sarah Blackburn is a home cook, recipe developer, vegetable gardener and managing editor of Edible Boston. She can be reached at sarah@edibleboston.com