Classic, Flaky Pâte Brisée For Savory Pies

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL PIAZZA / STYLED BY CATRINE KELTY

Any homemade pie is going to be better with a homemade piecrust, and if you have a food processor, it’s much easier to make than you may think. I’m pretty sure this recipe originally came from Martha Stewart’s Pies & Tarts—which is out of print—but I’ve tweaked it a bit. A while back I committed it to memory so around the holidays, when I have a little free time, I can make loads of dough and freeze it, leaving me disks ready to thaw and fill at the spur of the moment. Of course, a store bought piecrust will always do in a pinch, but I encourage you to give a homemade one a try this winter.

Ingredients:
2½ cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sugar (for sweet fillings add 3 tablespoons sugar instead)
2 sticks of ice-cold butter, diced
½ cup ice water, as needed
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
Makes 2 bottom-crust pies or 1 double-crust pie

Directions:

Place the flour, salt, and sugar in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Pulse a few times to blend, then add the butter and pulse again until the butter pieces are about pea-sized.

Through the feed tube, slowly drizzle in the ice water, a little at a time, pulsing as you go, until the flour and butter are just moistened, then add the vinegar and pulse again. You will likely not need all the water. Check if the dough is moist enough by squeezing a bit of it with your fingers; if it holds together, it’s ready.

Dump the dough out in to two equal piles onto two separate pieces of wax paper or parchment, and using the edges of the paper, bring each pile together to form a ball. Flatten the balls into discs, then wrap them tightly in the paper and then in plastic wrap. Allow to rest in the fridge for at least 30 minutes and up to one day. If you want to store the dough longer than a day or so, freeze it and allow it to thaw overnight in the fridge before rolling.

Sarah Blackburn is a home cook, recipe developer, vegetable gardener and managing editor of Edible Boston. She can be reached at sarah@edibleboston.com