Apple Galette with Maple Glaze

PHOTO BY MICHAEL PIAZZA / STYLED BY CATRINE KELTY

A galette is like a free-form pie, for when you just want pie for pie’s sake. You can use your favorite pie dough for this, and even change up the fruit in the filling—pears would be a nice substitute. The maple caramel is the important part here.

Makes 1 (10-inch) pie

Caramel:
1 cup maple syrup
¼ cup granulated sugar
4 tablespoons butter
¼ cup heavy cream
pinch salt

Filling:
2–3 apples, peeled
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon bourbon
pinch salt
1 recipe pâte brisée or store-bought piecrust
1 egg, beaten

First, make the caramel. Reduce 1 cup of maple syrup to half a cup. Then whisk in ¼ cup of granulated sugar and simmer for 5 minutes, to dissolve. Turn the flame to low and add the butter; whisk to incorporate. Slowly pour in the cream. Whisk continuously on medium-low heat until thick, and the sauce coats a metal spoon. Season with a pinch of salt to taste.

Core the apples and slice very thin, about the thickness of a quarter (use a mandoline or very sharp knife). Toss with the brown sugar, bourbon and salt. Allow the apples to macerate for one hour. Once they’ve softened, toss with 5 tablespoons of the caramel, and let sit another 10 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Roll out the pie dough on a floured work surface into a circle about 14 inches in diameter and transfer to a parchment-lined baking sheet. Drain the apples, and arrange in the center of the dough. Fold the edges of the dough over the filling so that about 2 inches of it covers the apples all around. Brush the dough with beaten egg. Bake until it begins to brown, then drop the temperature to 325° for another 30 minutes. Allow to cool before serving with extra caramel drizzled over the top.

(If you like, reserve some of the apples’ macerating juices and pour into more bourbon over ice; garnish with a lemon and enjoy as a cocktail. It’s also delicious stirred into fizzy water as a homemade apple soda.)

 

BEN RIGBY is a professional cook, freelance writer and anthropologist. Amateur gardening and banjos round out the days. Follow him on instagram at @rigbybenjamin