edible-cover-spring-2015

SPRING 2015

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Features

Kids-2 BUSMAN’S HOLIDAY: IN THE KITCHEN WITH CHEFS AND THEIR KIDS
by Sarah Blackburn
GrowingBusiness- ARTISAN FOOD BUSINESSES: IS THAT COOKIE WORTH IT?
by Andrea Pyenson
Meals3-1 PICKED, SEALED, DELIVERED
by Steve Holt
15005-01-234-Edit AERONAUT: BEER. SCIENCE. FOOD. FUN.
by Andrea Pyenson
Aeronaut-2 ARTISAN BREAD COMES TO WORCESTER
by Margaret LeRoux

 

Edible Food Finds

Vesta VESTA MOBILE PIZZA
by Rebecca Hansen
AncientBakers THE ANCIENT BAKERS
by Lesley Mahoney O’Connell
HouseBear HOUSE BEAR BREWING
by Rosie DeQuattro

 

Farmer’s Diary

RITES OF SPRING
by John Lee

 

Edible Tastings

Edible Basics

DEANO’S PIZZA
by Sarah BlackburnPasta_Left
SUNDAY DINNERS
by Sarah Blackburn
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Aeronaut: Beer. Science. Food. Fun

15005-01-234-Edit

By Andrea Pyenson / Photos by Adam Detour

Like many of its high tech counterparts that were launched in their founders’ garages, Somerville’s Aeronaut Brewing Company began in its founders’ apartment. But the operation really gained traction in their backyard before settling, about a year ago, in the former Ames Safety Envelope building just outside Union Square. The creation of three friends with serious science cred, Aeronaut opened in late June 2014 and makes very good, very interesting beer. But there is so much more than beer brewing at 14 Tyler Street.

Co-founders Ben Holmes, 28, Ronn Friedlander, 30, and … Read More

Artisan Food Businesses: Is that Cookie Worth it?

GrowingBusiness-

By Andrea Pyenson

Boston may be the home of the bean and the cod, but we are now also the home of the bean-to-bar chocolate as well as the handmade caramel and home-cooked preserves, not to mention sweet and savory baked goods crafted by hand rather than machine. Thanks largely to a growing DIY culture, the internet, and year-round farmers markets that give them direct access to customers (and vice versa), food artisans are proliferating, combining their passion and talents and drawing on a wealth of local ingredients.

Producing food by hand, on a small scale, using high quality ingredients, … Read More

Picked, Sealed, Delivered

Meals_Left

By Steve Holt / Photos by Kristin Teig

The local, good food movement is growing up. Moving beyond Pollanean “here’s the problem” rhetoric, the movement is now primarily characterized by solutions, many of which aim to answer a core question: how do we ease the practice of healthy eating among an increasingly busy population?

Nationally, a crop of fresh food delivery startups are shortening the distance between people and their food, and in the process getting busy Americans back in the kitchen and around the dining room table together. The concept got a big push earlier this year when Beyoncé … Read More